culture/nature/structure

Meghan Moe Beitiks
Projects

Performing Public Health (2020)

Graphic Design by Edith Williams

Graphic Design by Edith Williams.

I am the Lead Facilitator of a project called Performing Pubic Health for the Center for Arts in Medicine, as part of their COVID-19 Arts Response.

From our website:

How do we collectively Perform Public Health? Three overlapping teams of artists, administrators, health officials, academics, researchers and activists offer tools for safe engagement with the arts, chronicle the adaptive powers of artists, and organize resources emerging from artist communities, in an attempt to answer that question. 

The Advisory team has created a Performing Public Health Advisory Brief, which offers basic suggestions for safe practices, as well as appendices on infection control recommendations, finding reliable information and links to articles and studies for artists and communities effected by COVID-19.

The efforts include contributions to the COVID-19 Arts Response Repository, helping to chronicle the “performance” of public health through the arts during the time of the pandemic.

Within these efforts, Remote Cultures emerge in response to the lack of human contact that a pandemic imposes. In this context, Remote Cultures are the artworks, gatherings, adaptations and connections we create when health measures dictate social distance. They are how we maintain closeness, creativity, expression when the space between us is dictated by a virus or a law, or mediated by a screen or mask. Visit this page for a curated focus on the arts’ adaptive power in the context of a pandemic created by this team. 

Within public health measures, the needs of marginalized artists are not always thoroughly considered. They are uniquely precarious, made vulnerable by systemic racism, disability, poverty, compromised immune systems, age, and a number of other factors. Marginalized artists can also possess experiential expertise directly relevant to a pandemic. The Unique Precarities team curates the work of vulnerable artists and communities and places them alongside institutional research, to serve as an interdisciplinary index of creative support. Please visit this pagefor resources from Uniquely Precarious artists and the systems in which they are entangled.

Performing Public Health considers the specialized concerns of artists and public gatherings at a time when gathering for in-person art experiences is constrained by the possible transmission of an infectious disease like COVID-19. Please visit the resources below for more information.

Performing Public Health 


This project was created by the following humans: 

  • Meghan Moe Beitiks, Artist, University of Florida 
  • Aaron Colverson, University of Florida
  • Chloe Dean, University of Florida
  • maxpú hiⁿga miⁿga (charlee huffman), MFA, M.Div. (Kansa/Potawatomi)
  • Srinjoyi Lahiri, Young Artivist Alliance
  • Keely Mason, University of Florida 
  • Edith Moore Hubert, Jacksonville University, Linda Berry Stein College of Fine Arts
  • Virginia Pesata, University  of Florida
  • Katrina Pineda, California Representative of the Arts Health Early Career Research Network
  • Natalie Rella, University of Florida
  • Jill Sonke, University of Florida 
  • Marina Tsaplina, Transdisciplinary Artist, Health Humanities Scholar, Disability Advocate
  • Edith Williams, Graphic Designer
  • Kaitlyn Wittig Menguc, Artist & Arts Consultant

We’re also very grateful to our colleagues working in the arts, social work and activism, Arts + Health and Art Place America for their input on the development of this project.  

Project Credits and Citations:

  • Pesata, V., Moore Hubert, E., Wittig Menguc, K., Beitiks, MM.  (2020). Performing Public Health: Advisory. Retrieved from (insert URL). 
  • Colverson, A., Pineda, K. Lahiri, S. (2020).  Performing Public Health: Remote Cultures. Retrieved from (insert URL). 
  • Tsaplina, M., Beitiks, MM., Huffman, C. (2020). Performing Public Health: Unique Precarities. Retrieved from (insert URL).

Subatomic Systems of Self (2015)

I created a series of images for the PITTsburgh Particle physics Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC) at the University of Pittsburgh. The images pulled stills from the video MicroBooNE system and arranged them on a grid, as in a Neutrino Detector hitmap, accompanied by quotes from philosopher David Galin. The panels measure 2.5′ x 3.5′ x 1/8″ thick.

Microboundaries (2013)

vaccae iconMicroboundaries is a game designed to help you experience two things: the needs of beneficial bacteria, and new places and perspectives in your urban environment.

There are 5 bacteria to choose from. Each of them provides a unique and beneficial service to us and our world. Some of them live in the earth’s crust, others in deep water or amongst the roots of plants. Their work is ever-present and invisible. Each of them has an icon designed by my collaborator Brooke Collins.

Micro-Boundaries asks: where would this bacteria live in your city? What kind of places can you imagine that it might like? How does it become present in your world?

Take a photo of a place that fits the criteria for that bacteria with Instagram. Upload with your photo map on and hashtag the bacteria type. Colonize your city with microbes. Discover new places in your city, gain new perspective, help spread the word about the good work of these ‘bugs’.

www.microboundaries.net

 

 

 

 

The Plant was Present (2011)

Sansevieria Trifasciata, an epic houseplant, performed its work “The Plant is Present” at the School of the Art Institute’s New Blood Performance Festival, November 19th and 20th, 2011. The plant sat silently while a total of 138 visitors took turns sitting in a chair opposite it, staying in its presence for as long as they liked. All guests were photographed, and asked to record their experience in a comment book. Responses ranged from “I felt a connection to the plant and was able to live in the moment” to “It was awkward” to “So good! I loved every second of it!” to “Marina was exactly as interesting.” Check back later for more documentation, a full transcription of the comment book and photos of all 138 visitors to the plant.

Funhouses (2003+)

In the early 2000s I got very excited about funhouses as interactive spaces of abstract form. While traveling around the country with veggie buses and hitchhiking, I would stop at state fairs and carnivals to take pictures, and geek out on Carnival History. At some point I also assisted an elementary school class in making their own roller coasters. This is essentially an archive of the photos and explorations of that time.